THE MOST DISTURBING THING TO WATCH IS A 1080ED ANIMAL DIE … THE PLEADING IN THEIR EYES AS THEY TRY AND DRAG THEMSELVES TO SHELTER

THE MOST DISTURBING THING TO WATCH IS A 1080ED ANIMAL DIE … THE PLEADING IN THEIR EYES AS THEY TRY AND DRAG THEMSELVES TO SHELTER


My experience of 1080 poison

by Stewart Shand via Carol Sawyer

 “I MAY HAVE BEEN THE BRINGER OF DEATH. BUT NOT SUFFERING. ALSO I DIDN’T KILL WHAT I WAS TRYING TO SAVE, AS IN THE BIRDS”

Back in the mid 1990s I was awarded an eradication contract with a forestry administration company in the Wairarapa. My job was to eradicate anything that had four legs, a tail, and a head from 6000 hectares of farm land. This farm land was bought by an overseas investor and was being planted in pines. The original contract ran for two years until the pines had established themselves.

In the contract I could remove from the property any, if not all the dead animals I wanted. This arrangement would give me a fairly good income from possum fur on top of the contract fee. So I thought.

To do the job efficiently I split things up into categories and times. For instance sheep and cattle in daylight. Possums at night. Rabbits and hares at night. Deer at night. Goats in daylight. Pigs in daylight and night. Traps and cyanide laid in daylight, and so on. Then the days and nights were split to target specific animals. If I was targeting rabbits and hares on a particular night, all the deer, sheep, etc were left alone. OK, I did take out the odd deer, pig and possum. No two consecutive nights had the same target.

For those wondering how I can see things at night, not very many nights are pitch black and you do get used to it over time. Also I used to have a small hand torch strapped to my shoulder to help when I was rolling a smoke. The kill light was a million candlepower handheld spotlight hooked into the motorbike. Also a 500 candlepower battery-run backpack spotlight for when I had to leave the bike.

As with most people working days or night shift I had my break times. These break times coincided with me reaching particular parts of the farm. These places were sheltered spots and mostly near native bush. A couple were right on the boundary with a conservation property. Another spot was beside an area of manuka that had been crush-rolled so they could plant in amongst it. It was in these areas when you switched off the lights and engine of the four wheeler that you could lay back on the ground and appreciate the noises made by the night life. Kiwis calling, nightingales flitting around, moreporks calling. The odd hedgehog coming in to see what you have for smoko.

Then the night up by the crushed manuka, two little moreporks landing on the front carrier of the bike with their big eyes sort of asking what’s for dinner. Parent sitting on the fence watching both myself and them.

The next night I returned at about the same time, this time with cut up rabbit. I waited around for a while and they didn’t turn up so I left pieces of rabbit on the ground and on the fence posts. Two nights later I was back in the area and with a bit of possum was going to leave them a feed. The lights picked them up sitting on the fence as I was going down the track. To keep a long story short, over time I could get fairly close to them but not quite hand feed them.

Meanwhile back in the other spots the night life could get rowdy on occasions. I used to take out the odd person with me for a hunt and they loved sitting in these places listening. A lot of them never realised just how much night life was in the bush.

Well all this changed the day the council twats turned up. 

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Comment by Aroha Kingi on January 8, 2018 at 13:05
Bullies thrive on fear mongering so gues some expert advice on dealing with bullying from an official perspective might be helpful here.
Bullying is a big problem at all levels of society.
Comment by Graeme H on January 8, 2018 at 12:57
Yes agreed
And now with the zero invasive predator ZIP they allow themselves to drop with only 24 hours notice  and far more poison per hectare.
The last drop the did between Hokitika and Whataroa the cost was in the millions Big money .
They very dangerous people
Comment by Aroha Kingi on January 8, 2018 at 12:57
Speaking out about this in whatever way we can takes courage.
Thanks to anyone who cares enough to do so.
Comment by Danielle on January 8, 2018 at 12:45

More like trashing the environment on purpose for the cabal.

Comment by Danielle on January 8, 2018 at 12:44

Yes I agree Annemieke. Sadly, our govt is in serious denial and avoidance currently. On this topic especially. We have the massive cover up on the family recently poisoned, and people have brought this to their attention for years, the cruelty, greeted by stone walls, after all they're 'saving the birds' (not).

Comment by Annemieke de Jong on January 8, 2018 at 12:40

What kind of society are we creating? How on earth can this ever be justified? If everyone reading this and knowing this bombards newspapers and their local MP as well as the "supposed party of conservation" the Green Party, we may stir some emotions or common sense. Nothing will change until we the people make a loud noise and make life hell for those in Wellington who can make different decisions about conservation in our country!!

Comment by Danielle on January 8, 2018 at 11:06

It is Aroha. For sure. They have the gall to call it conservation. Morons IMO. And they're not letting up.

Comment by Aroha Kingi on January 8, 2018 at 10:52
Incredibly sad to read such a candid expression of how our govt use of 10/80 poison, which is known by the World Health organization to be one of the mos deadly poisons, is changing our wildlife and our way of life permanently and in such a destructive way.
Poison is so not the answer in our pursuit of environmental balance and, dare I say CONSERVATION!!!!!

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